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they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
protests throughout the muslim world today after friday prayers came to an end. in egypt, crowds in cairo and alexandria waved palestinian flags and chanted anti-israeli slogans. thousands of people also turned out in yemen to denounce the israeli offensive. and in turkey, a one-time israeli ally, people in istanbul called for the death of the jewish state. >> brown: and for more on the conflict, we are joined by hisham melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thoand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the el
. by the way, they now have a common border with egypt. they can send people and we don't think there is any shortage of food, any other human needs. we are open to that they can move. it's only against arms and they can ship, they can come, they can go and they can stop. we cannot stop. it's one-sided. that's the problem. we left gaza willingly. nobody forced us. and we are aware that gaza is densely populated. it doesn't give us any pleasure whatsoever to see anybody in gaza suffering. what for? we want to regain peace with them. we don't hate them. we don't try to get any glories or any victovictories. we want to live in peace. they can stop any suffering in one second. stop shooting and that's it. officials say we stop shooting, it won't help. the order of 200, 300 missiles a day, one-sided, their initiative. look, i am for fairness but to be fair when you have [ inaudible ], without a choice, you cannot equalize the two of them. >> if you believe, mr. president, that iran is behind a lot of the hamas terror activity, as you put it, then what action do you intend to take against iran? >>
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
on the states because it's been a very fascinating story. egypt is still going through a revolution, halt asserted -- hasn't asserted itself, needs help from the rest of the world particularly economically. it can't be as assertive and play a role. iraq is not really fully integrated into the arab world left. what does that leave? syria is in trouble. that leaves the gulf cooperate council state led by saudi arabia. so what we have now is a coalition state, the gulf cooperation council around saudi arabia that invited two other states into the royal club, jordan and morocco, to broaden the gcc in exchange for economic and security cooperation going in different directions, and that is the coalition right now that is the powerful coalition in the arab world. and the states that are going through change are somewhat marginalized, there's no one else is so if you want to call that unity, go ahead. that's what we have. >> that's a problem. egypt will come back. >> it'll come back. >> and soon. >> and then in terms of identity politics, you get to a country like libya, you add the tribal -- >>
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
is on board. >> gregg: and christmas in egypt. a christians in egypt have a new leader. we have a video of the elaborate ceremony. >> heather: and weeks after super storm sandy how is lower manhattan recovering from the devastation. anna is there and has the answer for us. >> reporter: the cleanup continues, many businesses and residential towers are using generators for power and pumps to get the water out. some have not reopened yet. we will hear from a business owner and community leader after this break. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercede
and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, are a superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the region because of the situation in lebanon and in syria. lebanon is really the coming disaster and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so of course all of this will go in and if i were american and while the american negotiators i would say, this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are coming. but still as always -- we have to wait to see who he appoints as the point p
about egypt? could we see this president reached out to the president and talk about what is going on? >> the president, as you know, has broken no on numerous occasions with president -- has occasions mn numerous with numerousoris. -- with president morsi going forward. i do not have an agenda on what those conversations with look- alike. we have raised concerns. the state department put out a statement on this about the briefing. the state department have more information of this of a client how he has communicated those concerns. our interest is in the process, the transition to a democracy continuing in the development of a government that reflects the will of the egyptian people. we are working towards that. we believe it is in the interest of the american people and of the united states but also because it reflects the will and the interest of the egyptian people. >> democracy is in the process, but doesn't look like there is a transitioning to a dictatorship? >> important to take a step back. in november 2012, lookout -- look at how much has changed in that region of since late
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the internet or the whole darn thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a si
-moon who traveled to cairo today where those negotiations are taking place. is he going to meet with egypt's president mohammed morsi tomorrow. later this week he will travel to israel to meet with prime minister netanyahu and also to the west bank to meet the palestinian president mahmoud abbas. the trouble with these negotiations as so often in these cases is who stops firing first. in the word of u.s. officials that is clearly up to hamas to do. listen. >> we have been very clear that israel has a right of self-defense. we have been very clear that rockets continue to be fired and land on israel. we have been very clear that we are working to try to get this conflict deescalated. we have been very clear about our concern for civilians and innocence on both sides. >> important to note that while diplomacy has not yet succeeded, neither, shep, has it failed. shep? >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations for us. well, it was a huge day on wall street. as stocks soared to the best trading session since the presidential election since nearly two weeks ago. if you have been afraid to
. dagen: the u.s. embassy meantime in egypt now closed amid protests in the country against president mohammad morsi. voting has started on the new constitution. kc mcfarland, formerly distance secretary of defense and fox news national security analyst, great to see you. he is in the catbird seat because he inserted himself into the peace agreement between israel and hamas. >> he negotiated a cease-fire between israel and hamas, the words were not out of president obama's mouth praising him for this, offering to help him with half a billion dollars of aid, convincing the imf to give him almost $5 billion of aid and what did morsi do? e seized all the controls of power. already got the parliament and the presidency, put his guys in the military and taking over. connell: in the old days they used to say hosni mubarak was not the best guy in the world but the u.s. can work with him. what about now? >> that is an important difference to make because he was a dictator, hosni mubarak was that he was our guy, pro-american and kept peace with israel. the new guy is a dictator too but not nec
years. you've had dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they're working on syria. you could point to examples in borrow ran, for example, that's not moving as fast. part of the obama philosophy is very -- which is very interesting is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in the trap of unnecessary war, repetition of quagmire. you have two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. people on the streets clear my opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, bush in tan man square. -- ton man square. -- tiananmen square. there's lots of examples where we tell folks -- bush sr. and iraq telling saddam if you want to crack down the shia, so be it . and because of that factor, that's one of the key factors that got them pushed out. libya was a different story where you have the possibility of a massacre occurring and obama said i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can't get a true blue international coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a t
leadership's be it in egypt or turkey, and it's probably the move to undermind the palestinian authority because he's going to the united nations asking for the status of the states, observer state, but the change of subject, at least by the israelis away from iran and syria, on to gaza, to me, is a very fascinating development. is it temporary or going to be an ongoing -- how long is that change of subject? sometimes leaders and security people know better. they feel they could have contained escalation. maybe that's what they have in mind. is it doable? does it work in this part of the region we live in? the third promise president obama made, again, never made any commitments to syria on syria except on the chemical weapons. now, we understand right now that, you know, there's concern there was a suggestion of a need of 70 # ,000 troops in order to secure the chemical facilities in syria in case there's any suspicious movement, be it by, you know, helping, you know, by the jihadists taking over or the regime using these chemical weapons. i mean, this is a big promise as well. what pre
continues here in sacramento county. >> thank you. egypt a court gave the death sentence to the man who created that anti muslim movie. the film maker is known by many names, he is in a united states jail for a probation violation involving a bank fraud conviction. the court in egypt tried him in absentia along with seven others, they were all charged with insulting the islamic religion. >>> protesters continue to clash with police in egypt. they object to the power grab by the new president. the protesters say the president's decree that gave himself new sweeping powers is not in the spirit of the revolution that forced out the long time dictator. the president said he will address the nation today and respond to the critics. >> a human rights group confirms what survivors have said about that factory fire that killed more than a hundred people, that they were locked inside as the flames spread. the head of the institute for global labor and human rights said the fire department used bolt cutters to cut the locks. 112 were killed in the fire. managers locked the gates as the fire alar
of israel" that egypt can affect and lead the process of building democratic and constitutional regime that will become a dream for african and southern hemisphere. the group wants to make shariah law main source of the constitution. election is in the books but some d.c. voters might have mistakenly shown up to vote today. local media reports say tuesday morning nearly 2,000 district voters receive democratic robo calls telling them to vote tomorrow. as in wednesday. the democratic party says the foul-up happened because a vendor recycled a message from the day before. the party says the call was rerecorded and the entire list of 100,000 infrequent or new d.c. voters were recalled and urged to vote tuesday instead. >>> election day in america is viewed with considerable interest around the world. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg shows us from london. >> mr. speaker, the house will join me in congratulating president obama on the election victory. >> europeans overwhelmingly wanted to see president obama return to the white house. the special edition of the front page s
from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we expect to hear from him on national television later tonight in a taped address. he's likely to introduce a new constitution, and that constitution could either make things better on the streets or it could inflame more protests, really depending on how hard line an islamist slant that constitution takes. we are likely to see more street protests here in egypt, both for and against the president on friday and
state. >> various countries, in to your knowledge, in libya, in egypt and also in yemen they perceive the attack in benghazi not just as a victory for them. a successful one and a mullah for -- model for future attacks. >> analysts say it takes six weeks for the leader to respond to make news events. this is put down to his news security. he knows bin laden's undoing was a courier who relayed these audio and video messages to the web; >> shepard: catherine herridge in washington tonight. attack in benghazi, fox news has learned the house intelligence committee is planning to hold a hearing next week but that hearing will be behind closed doors. no public. sources say they expect the witnesses to include the director of national intelligence, james clapper and the cia director david petraeus. at least 39 people are dead after a magnitude 7.4 earthquake hit off the coast of guatemala this morning. officials there say the worst of the damage is in the state of san marcos near the mexican border. a red cross spokesperson says folks across the entire country felt the quake and there are re
. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan we gave tremendous amounts of foreign aid to egypt. you know what right now? egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening israel because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're sending to egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a peace. if you're not participating you don't get the dollars. that is job one. we need our commitment to foreign poll to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country and we need to do everything we can to fulfill our commitment. which incidentally all the foreign aid we give israel, military aid is spent right here in america on american jobs. that is one of the requirements. but when you look broadly at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope this would continue deepak civil we're falling into what has become not secular governments but religious governments. we need to be gathering up all of our allies and we need to be making a firm statement that this region needs to be stablized and we need to protect people that serve in ou
. they left san diego in may far seven month deployment. >>> egypt christian church has a new pope. the boy wearing a blindfold chose the name of the new pay tree arch from a crystal chalice. the new pope will be the new leader. they have long complained of discrimination from muslim majority. >>> the world's largest race was supposed to be held today in new york city, but mayor bloomberg canceled it so all city resources can be used toward sandy relief. as reporter matt tells us some of the tens of thousands of runners wished that decision could have come a bit sooner. >> reporter: italian running team pauses for a picture with the new york city marathon canceled they want to volunteer to help storm victims. >> we tried to do our best. we asked the possibility to help the people in new jersey and the island. and we are available. >> reporter: about 40,000 runners were already in the city when the race was called off. chuck ferguson and his friends wore their race number. they qualified for the race by raising money for the leukemia and lymphoma society. >> obviously it's disappointing. i d
management >>> u.s. election is certainly making headlines around the world today from egypt to europe. our reporters are fanned across the globe with reaction. >> i'm ben wedeman in cairo. most egyptians seem to prefer barack obama over mitt romney. many of them saying they thought the republicans are simply too pro israeli. but for most egyptians, there is so much going on in this country after the revolution, what with a faltering economy, and an uncertain political future. >> reporter: i'm fred platkin in berlin, germany. germans are by and large happy with the outcome of the election. barack obama would have gotten 90% of the vote here in this country. >> reporter: i'm reza sayah in pakistan. four years ago many here supported mr. obama. not the case this year. many wanted change. they wanted mr. romney and that's because they still don't like u.s. policy in the region, especially the drone strikes. >> americans have weighed in on several important ballot initiatives. take a look at this. for the first time voters in maine approved a measure giving same sex couples the right to marry.
is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)